Get Results With Flitz Metal Polish

Flitz does it all! But it really kicks butt polishing metals like: aluminum, chrome, and stainless steel. To get the best results using Flitz metal polish follow the following steps:

Polishing Process

First:

Determine the extent of the oxidation on your metal. If you are working on Aluminum, Brass or Copper, and there is some heavy corrosion on the surface you will want to acid wash the surface first. This will clean the surface, remove all the heavy corrosion and help prepare the metal for the polishing process. If you are working with stainless steel or chrome that has heavy rust or some pitting in the metal you can use some #0000 Steel wool along with the polish to help remove the rust out of the pits.

Second:

Don’t use too much polish! One of the biggest mistakes people make is that they get excited to polish something and they are used to using inferior products that take a lot of polish to make them work. The old adage if a little is good then a lot is better does not apply while you are using Flitz. Use just a little bit of polish in a small area and polish while it is still moist. Do not let the polish dry.

Third:

Rub the polish back and forth using any kind of soft cloth or a paper towel. For surfaces that are brushed like stainless steel appliances you will want to rub in the direction of the grain.

Polishing By Hand

For best results any kind of a paper product seems to work best while using the product by hand, finishing it up with a Flitz Microfiber Polishing Cloth.

Polishing With Power Tools

I have found it very helpful to use the aid of power tools while polishing many surfaces. The size and contour of the surface will determine which tool is the best to use.

Small to medium surfaces:

For most small to medium sized surfaces, such as headlights, paint on cars, wheels etc. I have found the Flitz Buff and Polish Ball is the most effective tool to use. First apply the polish to the flat surface of the polishing pad and run the buffer at slow speed to allow the polish to spread out and begin breaking down the oxidation on the surface. Next you will want to run the buffer at high speeds to begin buffing the surface down to a smooth finish. Using the Flitz Ball with the absorbent viscose felt will pick up any oxidation and left over polish when you are done. Lastly you will want to come back over the surface with a Flitz Microfiber Polishing cloth and pick up any left over lint or polish residue left by the buffer.

Large surfaces:

For Polishing larger surfaces I found it very helpful to use a orbital buffer with a Lambs wool pad. These style buffers were designed to polish large items in a short amount of time. The type of surface you will be polishing will determine the type of pad to be used. For polishing Metal you will primarily want to be using a lambs wool pad. Lambs wool is nice because it is durable and aggressive. The nice thing about lambs wool is that when catch a snag or bur on a piece of aluminum (common when polishing aluminum jet boats up in the northwest) it will only take a small chunk of wool out with out destroying the entire pad. First apply the polish to the pad and spread the polish around on the surface at slow speed. You will want to continue to polish at a slower speed (500-1000rpm) and allow the polish to break down the oxidation on the surface. As you do this you will be leaving alot of black residue behind. Don’t worry about this, just keep polishing until you have a large section completed. Then come back with some cheap white flour, the stuff you use in your kitchen to bake with, and apply about a 1/4 cup of flour onto a terry cloth towel or microfiber. Rub the flower onto the black residue. The flour will absorb all of the left over polish residue and leave you with a nice clean finish.

Conclusion

That’s it, your done! Flitz Leaves a protective coating over the top of the finish that lasts up to 6 months so you wont have to go out and re-polish your stuff for quite awhile.

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